Low Pressure Sodium Lighting

Learn the science behind low pressure sodium lighting and its applications as a choice for lighting in your home or commercial operation. This article reviews low pressure sodium lighting and its common uses.

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Learn the science behind low pressure sodium lighting and its applications as a choice for lighting in your home or commercial operation.   This article reviews low pressure sodium lighting and its common uses.

Low pressure sodium (LPS) lights are similar in operation to fluorescent lights, except that there is neon and sodium instead of argon and mercury, and there are no phosphors.


Yellow Color

The sodium vapor emits a yellow color without the help of
phosphors.

Very Efficient Lighting

They are highly efficient, and have seen use in parking lots and in overhead roadway lights.

Limited Use

The color output is almost a pure yellow, thus all colors viewed under LPS seem only to be shades of gray.  You can’t discern a blue car from a red car since they both appear dark brown.  If you park your car under LPS lights in a large parking lot, it may be difficult to recognize your car when you look for it.

LPS lighting is not widely used.

Thanks to our guest lighting expert – Lance Kaczorowski, who brings a wealth of expertise to the site:

Kaczorowski, a native of New York City, now resides in Fort Wayne, IN.  Kaczorowski has a 4-year degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, and also a 2-year degree in Electronics Engineering Technology from the Community College of the Air Force.  Kaczorowski’s broad work history includes (chronologically): Three years as a Mercedes-Benz mechanic; six years as an electronics technician with the Air Force; three years as a new product development engineer with General Electric Lighting in Cleveland; seven years as a new product development engineer and an engineering analyst with Grote Industries in Madison, IN; and currently as an engineering analyst with International Truck and Engine Corporation in Fort Wayne.

The first two years of Kaczorowski’s employment with General Electric consisted of extensive training in light source sciences and engineering under GE’s Edison Engineering Program.  Kaczorowski’s experience with lighting was broadened at Grote Industries, which is a supplier of vehicle lighting for heavy duty trucks.

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